Fabrics Fabric from babybirddesigns.etsy.com

Published on November 24th, 2009 | by Becky Striepe

3

Fab Fabrics: Organic Prints from Baby Bird Design

How sweet are these organic cotton prints from Baby Bird Design? I ran across Emily’s shop over the weekend, and I’ve got to say: I’m swooning from cuteness!


Emily Burger, proprietress of Baby Bird Design, is a stay-at-home mom and freelance designer who’s just recently gotten into fabric design. She says she’s chose to print her designs on organic cotton because:

I love to know that I’m creating fabric for childrens items that are healthy for them. My fabrics are 100% organic cotton and come in either knit or sateen. No chemicals or dyes are used as they are made with water based inks.

She’s got all sorts of fabric themes from forest and jungle creatures to the basics like polka dots and stripes. I’m particularly smitten with this Forest Friends pattern.

All of her fabrics are certified organic by Global Organic Textile Standards. You can find Emily’s designs in the Baby Bird Design Etsy shop and her other shop, Wall Candy.

[All images via Baby Bird Design. Used with permission.]


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About the Author

My name is Becky Striepe (rhymes with “sleepy”), and I am a crafts and food writer from Atlanta, Georgia with a passion for making our planet a healthier, happier, and more compassionate place to live. My mission is to make vegan food and crafts accessible to everyone!. If you like my work, you can also find me on Twitter, Facebook, and .



3 Responses to Fab Fabrics: Organic Prints from Baby Bird Design

  1. Pingback: Fab Fabrics: Organic Prints from Baby Bird Designs

  2. Pingback: True Up » Archive » Textile Stew: Indie Designers Edition

  3. Lorna says:

    Great to see organic fabrics for children at last, and they are a really lovely design, too. I’m sure most people are unaware of the fact that many fabrics contain susbstances such as formaldehyde to improve crease resistance and make the fabrics ‘easy care’. These chemicals offgas into the room from curtains, covers etc. and can also pass through the baby’s skin into their blood stream from clothing. We will be adding more organic products to our site in the next couple of months. If your interested to know more about chemicals in textiles check out our WordPress Blog at http://www.888lorna.wordpress.com and join the discussion.

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