Tools + Supplies

Published on May 21st, 2009 | by Kelly Rand

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Yearn Worthy Yarn: Debbie Bliss Eco

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Listen up Debbie Bliss fans, this yarn brand now carries a cute little eco yarn – exactly what we’ve all been waiting for.

Debbie Bliss Eco is an organic cotton that is the perfect aran/worsted weight yarn that comes in eighteen bright colors great for the turn of the season. The yarn is dyed using non-toxic dyes and the water is reclaimed and recycled during the dying process.

The other awesome thing about this yarn is where its fiber comes from. The organic cotton used to create this yarn is processed by Bio Re, a textile chain that works with farmers in India and Tanzania to produce certified organic cotton.

You can follow the projects of Bio Re from start to finish in their very open and seemingly transparent production chain. The company adheres to strict guidelines that covers the economic, environmental and human capital of it’s production.

It is quite impressive to see these three very important things being used and paid attention to in a successful and meaningful way. Knowing the way that Bio Re operates will definitely make me move this yarn up on my to knit with list.



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About the Author

Kelly covers visual arts in and around Washington, DC for DCist and is editor of Crafting a Green World. Kelly has also been published by Bust Magazine and you can find her byline at Indie Fixx and Etsy’s Storque and has taught in Etsy’s virtual lab on the topic of green crafting. Kelly helps organize Crafty Bastards: Arts and Crafts Fair, one of the largest indie craft fairs on the east coast and has served on the Craft Bastard’s jury since 2007. Kelly is also co-founder of Hello Craft a nonprofit trade association dedicated to the advancement of independent crafters and the handmade movement. Kelly resides in Washington, D.C. and believes that handmade will save the world.



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