Tools + Supplies

Published on January 29th, 2009 | by Kelly Rand

14

Yearn Worthy Yarn: Lion Brand Recycled Cotton

Man, there is a lot of recycled cotton yarn out there! We’ve looked over 2nd Time Cotton and perused what Redheart had to offer. Well now, Lion Brand has gotten in on the recycled cotton act to muted fanfare.

No trumpets or bugles, just a lonely blogger trying to give her readers more earth friendly yarn options.

This recycled cotton is made from t-shirt clippings and sorted by like color. It is then blended with acrylic and “other fiber,” so the actual amount of recycled content is just shy of 75%.

Lion Brand offers this yarn in seven colors in fun heathers and tweeds. My favorites are Marine and Seagrass. They are bright and bold. Some tweeds and heathers just aren’t very fun, but these seem to have the perfect mix of each color shade.

While I have to say, I’m still a little disappointed by the lower than excepted recycled content number (what is other fiber, anyways?) I’m happy to have another cotton to use for various knitted projects. What about you? Does the low recycled cotton put you off, or are you happy with the plethora of recycled cotton yarn choices?

[Image from Lion Brand's website]

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About the Author

Kelly covers visual arts in and around Washington, DC for DCist and is editor of Crafting a Green World. Kelly has also been published by Bust Magazine and you can find her byline at Indie Fixx and Etsy’s Storque and has taught in Etsy’s virtual lab on the topic of green crafting. Kelly helps organize Crafty Bastards: Arts and Crafts Fair, one of the largest indie craft fairs on the east coast and has served on the Craft Bastard’s jury since 2007. Kelly is also co-founder of Hello Craft a nonprofit trade association dedicated to the advancement of independent crafters and the handmade movement. Kelly resides in Washington, D.C. and believes that handmade will save the world.



  • http://www.looklovely.net Pat Foster

    The colour looks very attractive, but I would expect a higher percentage of recycled cotton!

  • http://www.looklovely.net Pat Foster

    The colour looks very attractive, but I would expect a higher percentage of recycled cotton!

  • http://www.looklovely.net Pat Foster

    The colour looks very attractive, but I would expect a higher percentage of recycled cotton!

  • http://ecopractical.blogspot.com/ Esther

    I have to say that the low recycled content of the yarn puts me off. I’m such an idealist I feel like we might as well do things right rather than better.

    It says that it is blended with acrylic, which is further disappointing because it cannot be composted at the end of it’s life cycle. So we keep t-shirt scraps out of the garbage for another use, but eventually they will end up there… *sigh*

  • http://ecopractical.blogspot.com/ Esther

    I have to say that the low recycled content of the yarn puts me off. I’m such an idealist I feel like we might as well do things right rather than better.

    It says that it is blended with acrylic, which is further disappointing because it cannot be composted at the end of it’s life cycle. So we keep t-shirt scraps out of the garbage for another use, but eventually they will end up there… *sigh*

  • http://ecopractical.blogspot.com/ Esther

    I have to say that the low recycled content of the yarn puts me off. I’m such an idealist I feel like we might as well do things right rather than better.

    It says that it is blended with acrylic, which is further disappointing because it cannot be composted at the end of it’s life cycle. So we keep t-shirt scraps out of the garbage for another use, but eventually they will end up there… *sigh*

  • http://ecopractical.blogspot.com/ Esther

    I have to say that the low recycled content of the yarn puts me off. I’m such an idealist I feel like we might as well do things right rather than better.

    It says that it is blended with acrylic, which is further disappointing because it cannot be composted at the end of it’s life cycle. So we keep t-shirt scraps out of the garbage for another use, but eventually they will end up there… *sigh*

  • http://essiewb.wordpress.com Essiewb

    I’m halfway through my first skein of Lion Brand Recycled Cotton and I’m disappointed. It knits beautifully, no problems there, but so far I’ve had at least eight lengths of yarn, varying sizes, not knotted together (thank goodness). If their process makes it impossible to turn out a skein in one continuous piece they should have warned us.

  • http://essiewb.wordpress.com Essiewb

    I’m halfway through my first skein of Lion Brand Recycled Cotton and I’m disappointed. It knits beautifully, no problems there, but so far I’ve had at least eight lengths of yarn, varying sizes, not knotted together (thank goodness). If their process makes it impossible to turn out a skein in one continuous piece they should have warned us.

  • http://essiewb.wordpress.com Essiewb

    I’m halfway through my first skein of Lion Brand Recycled Cotton and I’m disappointed. It knits beautifully, no problems there, but so far I’ve had at least eight lengths of yarn, varying sizes, not knotted together (thank goodness). If their process makes it impossible to turn out a skein in one continuous piece they should have warned us.

  • Anne Runquist

    I like it! I just knitted a cardigan in Seagrass, and I had no loose ends, no knots – one continuous fiber from beginning to end. It knits up beautifully – soft variations of color creates a wonderful texture. I’m hoping that it will look as good after I have washed it!

  • Anne Runquist

    I like it! I just knitted a cardigan in Seagrass, and I had no loose ends, no knots – one continuous fiber from beginning to end. It knits up beautifully – soft variations of color creates a wonderful texture. I’m hoping that it will look as good after I have washed it!

  • Anne Runquist

    I like it! I just knitted a cardigan in Seagrass, and I had no loose ends, no knots – one continuous fiber from beginning to end. It knits up beautifully – soft variations of color creates a wonderful texture. I’m hoping that it will look as good after I have washed it!

  • Anne Runquist

    I like it! I just knitted a cardigan in Seagrass, and I had no loose ends, no knots – one continuous fiber from beginning to end. It knits up beautifully – soft variations of color creates a wonderful texture. I’m hoping that it will look as good after I have washed it!

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