Holiday Crafts

Published on March 24th, 2008 | by Kelly Rand

5

Eggstacular!

Easter EggsHalf eaten boxes of marshmallow Peeps; straw from Easter baskets strewn about; slowly coming out of a sugar high; plastic egg halves littering the floor. Does this sound like you and the aftermath of Easter? Feeling a little unsure of what to do with those plastic eggs now that the hunt is over and the candy eaten?

Well have no fear because this week CAGW will tackle that very question and offer up nifty solutions to reusing your Easter eggs!

Fresh out of my sugar rush, I grabbed an errant egg and quickly put it to use. I stuffed the inside with all my loose garment buttons. You know the extra buttons that come on new clothes? I’ve never had a good place to put them all, until now. The plastic egg is the perfect size and makes a satisfying click when putting the halves back together. I labeled the egg with a Sharpie marker and decorated it with drawings of buttons so I know what’s on the inside. It is now nestled inside my sewing box.

For the rest, I was thinking of getting a jump start on my Easter decorations for next year and use one of these great egg knitting patterns and reuse the plastic eggs as stuffing.

Stay tuned throughout the week for other ideas on how to reuse and recycle plastic Easter eggs in your crafts.

[Easter eggs photo by Kelly Rand]

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About the Author

Kelly covers visual arts in and around Washington, DC for DCist and is editor of Crafting a Green World. Kelly has also been published by Bust Magazine and you can find her byline at Indie Fixx and Etsy’s Storque and has taught in Etsy’s virtual lab on the topic of green crafting. Kelly helps organize Crafty Bastards: Arts and Crafts Fair, one of the largest indie craft fairs on the east coast and has served on the Craft Bastard’s jury since 2007. Kelly is also co-founder of Hello Craft a nonprofit trade association dedicated to the advancement of independent crafters and the handmade movement. Kelly resides in Washington, D.C. and believes that handmade will save the world.



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